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Natural-Flavored Christmas Candy(Kohakuto) Recipe

Natural-Flavored Christmas Candy(Kohakuto) Recipe

Sachiko Murata |

Would you like to make Japanese traditional candies called Kohakuto for Christmas? They are fun to make, and also pretty as Christmas tree ornaments.

Kohakuto are a traditional Japanese candy, and which has been made for about 400 years since the early Edo Period.      Read more about the history from Tea Flavored Kohakuto (琥珀糖, Japanese Traditional Candy) Recipe  

 

 

 

 

Pink, yellow,  and green candies, with all their colors from natural ingredients.
Their colors come from Hibiscus Tea (dried roselle flower) ,Yuzu(Japanese type of citrus) powder, and Matcha

 

Hibiscus tea, yuzu powder and matcha, from the top

What beautiful colors they give us! They add nice tastes into the candies, too.

 

 

What You'll Need

1 Tea 

As shown above,  Hibiscus Tea  ,Yuzu(Japanese type of citrus) powder, and Matcha are used for this recipe. In fact, you can use any tea of your choice.

 

2 Granulated Sugar

Caster sugar or other types of sugar are usable ,but granulated sugar makes the taste smoother and look nicer.  

 

3 Kanten or Agar

Kanten is gelatinous substance, made from algae. Agar might come to your mind. Kanten is very similar to agar, but, as they are made from different algae, we consider agar and Kanten different ingredients. Their textures and the ways they're used are slightly different. It is however possible to use agar for this recipe, but the result may not be the same. 

 

4 Cookie cutters

It'll be nice if you use some Christmas cookie cutters. Children will enjoy making them. Even if you don't have any cookie cutters, you can make them with a knife or even with your hands tearing.

 

 

 

Natural-Flavored Kohakuto RECIPE

 

INGREDIENTS

[  For 20cm x 18cm / 8 in. x 7 in. container, 15-20 candies ]

 

200ml tea (choose one from below)

  pink type - 2g (1tea bag) Hibiscus Tea , hot water 200ml 

  yellow type - 4g (2tbsp) Yuzu powder , hot water 200ml

  green type - a half spoon Matcha , hot water 200ml                

4g(2tsp) / 0.15oz  powdered Kanten                   

300g / 10oz  granulated sugar      

 

 

INSTRUCTIONS 

1 make tea with 200ml of hot water. 

2. In a pan, place the tea and sprinkle in the Kanten. Heat on low-medium heat and then simmer for 1-2 minutes on a low heat stirring constantly. 

3 Add the sugar into the pan and mix constantly on low heat until the sugar dissolves. 

4 Pour the mixture into a container. Put the container into the fridge and let it chill for 1-2 hours until set.

5 Cut into shapes.

6 Place the pieces onto a parchment sheet and let them dry at room temperature for 1-2 weeks until they get a crystal skin on the outside.  

 

More detail instructions with photos from here

 

Don't throw away the leftovers from cutting shapes. The little pieces are also tasty!

 

If you would like to make tree ornaments, use a clean needle to put a thread  through the candy. 

 

Enjoy your Christmas preparations!  

 

 

Recipe

Tea Flavored Kohakuto (琥珀糖, Japanese Traditional Candy) Recipe  

 

 

 

 

Today's Recommendation 

Nakazen: Hibiscus Herbal Tea (loose, 100g)

Nakazen: Hibiscus Tea (tea bags)  

It is a tart, almost cranberry-like flavor and can be quite refreshing and nice. You can enjoy it deliciously iced or hot.

 

Oishi Tea Farm: Yuzu Powder (Granules) 乾燥ゆず皮(顆粒)

The yuzu peel grown in on the island of Tsushima, Nagasaki without pesticide were carefully dried and crushed. Enjoy the citric and refreshing scent and taste. The aroma of the yuzu will give a nice accent to your dishes.

 

Yunomi Matcha: Premium Culinary Grade Matcha (Spring Harvest)   

Also known as a latte grade or cafe grade, this matcha is meant for use in making lattes, chocolates, ice cream, matcha latte, and baked goods such as cakes, frosting, cookies, etc. What it lacks in color and aroma, it makes up in a flavor balanced in umami and astringency, combined with a smooth texture. (Yes you can drink it straight as a matcha too, but it’s not nearly as good straight as ceremonial grade options). 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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