2019 New Year's Greetings

On behalf of the staff at Yunomi, and the farmers, artisans and producers that make up the Yunomi Vendor Network, I would like to wish you a year filled with blessed fortune and the most wonderful tea moments—whether they be peaceful dew drops of solitude or bright fireworks of laughter with friends and family.

This Year of the Boar, in Japanese called Idoshi (ee-DOH-shi, 亥年), will be a turning point for Yunomi as we move in to the Yunomi Kominka in January. The Yunomi Kominka is a traditionally built Japanese house with a traditional tea ceremony room based in Odawara, Japan, about 45 minutes from Tokyo station via the Shinkansen bullet train. Your help in November and December last year helped us to secure a lease to the house, and we thank you deeply for all of your support.

By moving into this location, we hope to expand our efforts to provide greater access to the Japanese tea industry as well as other gourmet foodstuffs and crafts. We also plan greater efforts on tea education with tastings and seminars both in-person and online!

New Year's Promotion, $20.19 off orders of $50+

Code: HappyNewYear2019

Applies to first 19 customers, retail customers only. Good on all products throughout the store. Expires Jan. 7, 2019, Tokyo time.

Celebrating the New Year with a limited edition tea can

Year of the Boar gift canContaining 30 grams of fukamushicha from Shizuoka-based tea factory Seiko Tea Factory, this limited edition tea can is wrapped in Japanese washi paper featuring a design that celebrates the Year of the Boar. Harvest: Spring. Region: Shizuoka, Japan. Contents: 30 grams. Steaming: Deep-steamed.

 

Header Image: The Seven Gods of Fortune - Shichifukujin 七福神

Seven Gods of Fortune wish you blessings in 2019

The Seven Gods of Fortune from Japanese mythology are the patron gods of various professions originating from Japan (Ebisu 恵比寿), Chinese Taoism and Buddhism (Fukurokuju 福禄寿, Hotei 布袋, Jurojin 寿老人), and Hinduism practiced in Nepal and India (Benzaiten 弁財天, Bishamonten 毘沙門天, Daikokuten 大黒天). Can you find them all in the above image by matching the Japanese characters?

Read more about each of the Seven Gods on Wikipedia.

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